Simply natural cafe in the press

Simply Natural Café Organic Restaurant

There’s something to suit both health-conscious and adventurous tastes at Simply Natural Café: organic produce; grass-fed meat free of hormones and antibiotics; wild-caught seafood; raw, vegan and vegetarian dishes plus a few Persian specialties.

They added the café a few years ago as a place to enjoy meals with friends over glasses of organic wine and beer. The roses on the tables represent their passion for healthy food.

Start with lemony hummus, grilled eggplant with garlic and spices or ground walnut and pomegranate spread with whole-wheat pita. Salads include Waldorf with yogurt-honey dressing, chicken citrus with cashews and cranberries and mango with cucumber, tomato and onions tossed in lime juice and olive oil with mint.

The Sunshine Burger is house-made from lentils, brown rice and vegetables. Meat eaters can sink their teeth into a turkey, beef or bison burger. Salmon burgers and baked falafel are often specials.

For a taste of Persia try fesenjan with chicken or tofu cubes braised in walnut and pomegranate paste or gormeh sabzi, a vegetable and herb stew with dried limes served with basmati rice. Seasonal vegetables are cooked in coconut curry or stir-fried with ginger and sesame oil.

There are also steak, lamb chops and catch of the day. Raw chocolate mousse or acai berry sorbet sprinkled with granola and pomegranate seeds make for sweet endings.

Join us at our face book page

www.facebook.com/simplynaturalcafe.

Simply natural cafe in the press

ELAINE WALKER from Miami Herald wrote about us in thursday edition of the paper on August 20,2009:
Dining out doesn’t have to be incompatible with healthy eating. If someone in your party wants to indulge, they can do that too. 
SIMPLY NATURAL CAFE:
If you’ve gone organic, Simply Natural Cafe is the place for you. Everything on the menu including wines is organic, all meat is from are grass-fed animals and fish have low mercury content. Raw food lovers will find impressive choices like raw pizza, tacos and ice cream.
With the new age music in the background, it’s a cozy place where you can feel comfortable lingering over a magazine, but it’s not particularly child-friendly. The owners also have a health food store next door and integrate some of the merchandise into the restaurant.
Entree portions are huge. Chicken Italiano is chicken sautéed with a tangy-sweet combination of onion, garlic, sun-dried tomatoes, pine nuts and cranberries and served with pasta. Herb Sabdzi is a stew-like Persian dish of sautéed herbs, spinach, fenugreek, leeks, kidney beans and dried Persian lime with your choice of chicken, tofu or beef.
• Simply Natural Cafe, 8267 Sunset Strip, Sunrise; 954-742-8384, www.simplynaturalcafe.com; starters $3.99-$4.99, appetizer platters $13.99-$20.99, salads $6.99-$9.99, lunch $6.99-$12.99, most entrees $7.99-$15.99.

Organic beers and wines

There is great selection of organic wines and beers available at simply natural restaurant.come and try our great selections and enjoy.

Gift certificate available

Gift certificate is available for simply natural organic restaurant.To buy the  gift certificate,you can visit our restaurant  or call us at 954-742-8384.

Catering

Catering and take out service available.

Call us: 954-742-8384
Visit us at: 8267 Sunset Strip, Sunrise, FL 33322
Email us at: catering@simplynaturalcafe.com

Benefits of fruits

Here are some healthy tip for your smartness & physical fitness.  
Prevention is better than cure.
  
HEALTHY JUICES :

Carrot + Ginger + Apple  - Boost and cleanse our system.
Apple + Cucumber + Celery -   Prevent cancer, reduce cholesterol, and eliminate stomach upset and headache..  
Tomato + Carrot + Apple - Improve skin complexion and eliminate bad breath.  
Bitter gou rd + Apple  -   Avoid bad breath and reduce internal body heat.  
Orange + Ginger + Cucumber - Improve Skin texture and moisture and reduce body heat.  
Pineapple + Apple + Watermelon - To dispel excess salts, nourishes the bladder and kidney.  
Apple + Cucumber + Kiwi - To improve skin complexion.  
Pear & Banana -   regulates sugar content..  
Carrot + Apple + Pear + Mango - Clear body heat, counteracts toxicity, decreased blood pressure and fight oxidization .  
Honeydew + Grape + Watermelon  - Rich in vitamin C + Vitamin B2 that increase cell activity and strengthen body immunity.  
Papaya + Pineapple  - Rich in vitamin C, E, Iron. Improve skin complexion and metabolism.  
Banana + Pineapple  - Rich in vitamin with nutritious and prevent constipation 

Fruit  Benefit :
 
 apples :

Protects your heart, prevents constipation, Blocks diarrhea, Improves lung capacity, Cushions joints.

apricots :

Combats cancer, Controls blood pressure, Saves your eyesight, Shields against Alzheimer’s, Slows aging process.

artichokes:
 Aids digestion, Lowers cholesterol, Protects your heart, Stabilizes blood sugar, Guard s against liver disease.

 
avocados:
 Battles diabetes, Lowers cholesterol, Helps stops strokes, Controls blood pressure, Smoothes skin.

 
bananas:
 Protects your heart, Quiets a cough, Strengthens bones, Controls blood pressure, Blocks diarrhea.

 
beans:
 Prevents constipation, Helps hemorrhoids, Lowers cholesterol, Combats cancer, Stabilizes blood sugar.  
 
beets:
 Controls blood pressure, Combats cancer, Strengthens bones, Protects your heart, Aids weight loss. 
 
blueberries:
 Combats cancer, Protects your heart, Stabilizes blood sugar, Boosts memory, Prevents constipation.  
 
broccoli:
 Strengthens bones, Saves eyesight.

blue berries reduce belly fat

The new research, presented April 19 at the Experimental Biology convention in New Orleans, gives tantalizing clues to the potential of blueberries in reducing risk factors for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. The effect is thought to be due to the high level of phytochemicals – naturally occurring antioxidants – that blueberries contain.

The study was performed in laboratory rats. While the animal findings suggest blueberries may be protective against two health conditions that affect millions of Americans, more research should be done.

The researchers studied the effect of blueberries (freeze dried blueberries crushed into a powder) that were mixed into the rat diet, as part of either a low- or high-fat diet. They performed many comparisons between the rats consuming the test diets and the control rats receiving no blueberry powder. All the rats were from a research breed that is prone to being severely overweight.

In all, after 90 days, the rats that received the blueberry-enriched powder, measured as 2 percent of their diet, had less abdominal fat, lower triglycerides, lower cholesterol, and improved fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity, which are measures of how well the body processes glucose for energy.

While regular blueberry intake reduced these risks for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, the health benefits were even better when combined with a low-fat diet.

In addition to all the other health benefits, the group that consumed a low-fat diet had lower body weight, lower total fat mass and reduced liver mass, than those who ate a high fat diet. An enlarged liver is linked to obesity and insulin resistance, a hallmark of diabetes.

The rats in the study were similar to Americans who suffer fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome as a result of high-fat diets and obesity. Metabolic syndrome is a group of health problems that include too much fat around the waist, elevated blood pressure, elevated blood sugar, high triglycerides, and together these conditions increase the risk of heart attacks, strokes and diabetes.

But were the health benefits seen in rats a result of losing abdominal fat, or something else?

“Some measurements were changed by blueberry even if the rats were on a high fat diet,” says E. Mitchell Seymour, M.S., lead researcher and manager of the U-M Cardioprotection Research Laboratory. “We found by looking at fat muscle tissue, that blueberry intake affected genes related to fat-burning and storage. Looking at muscle tissue, we saw altered genes related to glucose uptake.”

Steven Bolling, M.D., a U-M heart surgeon and head of the Cardioprotection Laboratory, says: “The benefits of eating fruits and vegetables has been well-researched, but our findings in regard to blueberries shows the naturally occurring chemicals they contain, such as anthocyanins, show promise in mitigating these health conditions.”

Although the current study was supported by the U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council, which also supplied the blueberry powder, the council did not play a role in the study’s conduct, analysis or the preparation of the poster presentation.

 

Adapted from materials provided by

University of Michigan

Mercury in high fructose syrup

Mercury Found In High Fructose Corn Syrup Used As Food Sweetener

Researchers in the US found that much of the high fructose corn syrup that is increasingly replacing sugar in processed foods is tainted with mercury, a metal that is toxic to humans. They also tested many branded food products and found they too contained mercury.

The findings come from two studies, one of which is published in the journal Environmental Health and the other is by the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP).
Dr David Wallinga, who works at the IATP, was involved in both studies. He told the press that mercury was toxic in all its forms, and that:

“Given how much high fructose corn syrup is consumed by children, it could be a significant additional source of mercury never before considered.”

Use of HFCS as a sweetener instead of sugar has risen sharply in recent decades, and now is commonly used to sweeten breads, cereals, breakfast bars, beverages, luncheon meats, yogurts, soups, and condiments.

According to IATP estimates, the average American probably eats about 12 teaspoons of HFCS a day, with teenagers and consumers on the higher end of the spectrum perhaps eating 80 per cent higher than this.

In the first Environmental Health study, researchers, led by Renee Dufault, who was working at the FDA at the time, found mercury in nearly 50 per cent (9 out of 20) of samples of commercial high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) they tested in 2005.

In the second, IATP study, researchers sent 55 popular branded foods and drinks where HFCS is the first or second highest labelled ingredient to a commercial laboratory for testing; they found that nearly one third of them contained trace amounts of mercury.

Hazardous chemicals level in table wines

Potentially hazardous levels of metal ions are present in many commercially available wines. An analysis of reported levels of metals in wines from sixteen different countries found that only those from Argentina, Brazil and Italy did not pose a potential health risk owing to metals.

Declan Naughton and Doctor Andrea Petróczi from Kingston University, South West London, carried out the study, using a formula developed by the United States’ Environmental Protection Agency for the estimation of potential health risks associated with long-term exposure to environmental pollutants. This Target Hazard Quotient (THQ) gives an indication of risk based on published upper safe limits for various chemicals. A THQ below 1.0 is considered to be non-hazardous.

According to Professor Naughton, “The THQ is a risk assessment designed to avoid underestimation. It therefore incorporates several assumptions, such as maximum absorption of ingested metal ions and lifetime exposures. In contrast, bolus dosing (e.g. binge drinking) and cross effects with other potential toxins (e.g. alcohol) are not accounted for, nor are the effects on the elderly, the young or those with a clinical condition”.

The authors found that THQ values for most wines were well above the value of 1.0 and thus are of concern. Typical potential maximum THQ values ranged from 50 to 200, with Hungarian and Slovakian wines reaching 300. THQ values for both red and white wines studied were high, having values ranging from 30 to 80 based on a 250mL glass per day. Naughton said, “These values are concerning, in that they are mainly above the THQ value of 1.0. Excess intake of metal ions is credited with pathological events such as Parkinson’s disease. In addition to neurological problems, these ions are also believed to enhance oxidative damage, a key component of chronic inflammatory disease which is a suggested initiator of cancer”.

These results also question a popular belief about the health-giving properties of red wine: that drinking red wine daily to protect from heart attacks is often related to levels of ‘anti-oxidants’. However the finding of hazardous and pro-oxidant metal ions creates a major question mark over these supposed protective benefits. The authors recommend that, “Levels of metal ions should appear on wine labels, along with the introduction of further steps to remove key hazardous metal ions during wine production”.

Naughton and Andrea Petroczi. Heavy metal ions in wines: meta-analysis of target hazard quotients reveal health risks. Chemistry Central Journal